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1.

Understand Factors and Factor Pairs within 100

- 4th Grade Math

Fourth graders take tiny steps toward algebra with this fun factors and multiples interactive worksheet. Before they learn about other types of numbers - prime and composite, they understand what are factors and how to find factor pairs of a number.


What’s inside?

- Evaluate whether a given number is a factor of another given number.

- Find the number, given a set of factors.

- Compute factor pairs of a given number.

- Complete the set of factors for a given number.


Real-World Application

Factorization has myriad everyday applications. When travelling a distance of 300 miles, you may want to know how many hours it would take to cover the distance at a particular speed. Two factors of 300 that may help you with this calculation are 150 and 2. Clearly, 150 hours at 2 mph is ridiculously slow and 2 hours at 150 mph is too fast to be feasible. Let’s look at two other factors of the number: 60 and 5. Travelling at a speed of 60 mph for 5 hours sounds much more realistic.


What’s next?

With children now familiar with factors, they can proceed to learn about prime and composite numbers.


Cool Fact

Every number when broken down into its smallest factors, a process called factoring or factorization, gives rise to a unique set of factors. Because finding all the factors of a huge number is very hard, this property is widely used in cryptography - writing and understanding secret codes.

Common Core Alignment

4.OA.4Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1—100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1—100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1—100 is prime or composite.