Why parents choose Splash Math for their fourth graders?

  • Personalised Learning

    Intelligently adapts to the way each child learns

  • Fun Rewards

    Get coins for each correct answer and redeem coins for virtual pets

  • Actionable Reports

    Monitor progress with iPhone app, weekly emails and detailed dashboards

7.

Add Fractions (Sums up to 1)

- 4th Grade Math

Fourth graders have so far learned how to create equivalent fractions, compare fractions and convert mixed numbers to fractions and vice versa. With this understanding, they march ahead to adding fractions with like denominators. This colorful and engaging game easily fills in for your regular worksheets on adding fractions with like denominators by providing ample practice to children in a format that they enjoy.


What’s inside?

- Form a visual understanding of adding fractions with like denominators with the help of fraction bars and number lines.

- Learn to model an addition sentence of like fractions by coloring blocks to represent the sentence.

- Gradually move on to identifying the missing numbers in an addition sentence without relying on visual models.


Real-World Application

To figure out how much of a pie is eaten if two people eat, say, ¼ and 2/4 of it, we need to add the two fractions. Similarly, to calculating how much gas was filled in if we put in ⅓ of a gallon on a day and ⅔ on the next, we add the two fractions. While operations with fractions may come naturally to adults, children, too, can easily master these concepts if they grasp the fundamentals well.


What’s next?

After children have learned to add fractions with like denominators that sum up to 1, they can proceed to add like fractions that sum up to more than 1.


Cool Fact

The ancient Egyptians only used fractions of the form ‘1/n’. So, any other fraction had to be represented as a sum of such unit fractions!

Common Core Alignment

4.NF.3.aUnderstand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

4.NF.3.bDecompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.